inkfromtheoctopus:

Model of Human Skeleton made from wood.Joseph Towne.c. 1825.Gordon Museum.King’s College, London.

inkfromtheoctopus:

Model of Human Skeleton made from wood.
Joseph Towne.

c. 1825.
Gordon Museum.
King’s College, London.


Reblogged from A Curated Miscellaneum
Tags: skeleton art
Reblogged from A Curated Miscellaneum
mortem-et-necromantia:

Bubonic plague - wax sculpture by Eleanor Crook.

mortem-et-necromantia:

Bubonic plague - wax sculpture by Eleanor Crook.

malformalady:

Plastinated brain in an open skull with a neural pathway specimen
Copyright: Gunther von Hagens, Institute for Plastination, Heidelberg, Germany

malformalady:

Plastinated brain in an open skull with a neural pathway specimen

Copyright: Gunther von Hagens, Institute for Plastination, Heidelberg, Germany

Reblogged from TETRAGRAMMATON

peet-b-shelley:

Sedlec Ossuary, Kutná Hora

Reblogged from F. de l'Opéra
Tags: bones ossuary
os-sphenoidale:

The inside of a skull

os-sphenoidale:

The inside of a skull

Reblogged from TETRAGRAMMATON
Tags: skull

Stopped by the Museum of the Weird during a trip to Austin. It’s a cute little shoe box museum full of traditional sideshow exhibits, including a real life human oddity named John who impressed us with his skills with a bullwhip and his ability to conduct electricity safely. Yes, he really is holding a live wire against his tongue. He let us touch him while he was holding the wire and we got mild shocks akin to static. 

biomedicalephemera:

"Hey, has anyone seen my Snapple I left it here OH MY GOD IT’S F—-ING SMALLPOX"

We found some forgotten variola (smallpox) at the FDA laboratories in Bethesda, Maryland! They were fully sealed and there’s no evidence of tampering, and are now located at the secure BSL-4 CDC laboratory in Atlanta, Georgia, where the rest of the US stockpile is located.

The last naturally-occurring Variola major case was in a Bangladeshi girl in 1975, and the last Variola minor case was in a hospital cook in Somalia, in 1977. Eradication was complete by early 1978, and was formally declared in 1980.

In late 1978, a medical photographer became infected by a smallpox sample kept at the University of Birmingham, and subsequently died from the disease. One other person also became infected, but survived. The researcher who was overseeing the photography operation was distraught and committed suicide soon after the photographer’s death. After this, the WHO strongly encouraged all countries to destroy their stockpiles of smallpox.

There was significant resistance to the recommendation and pressure by both Russia and the United States, and today there are two formally declared laboratories that have the live virus - the CDC in Atlanta, Georgia, and VECTOR in Koltsovo, Russia.

Having worked in several labs, there’s this fear of throwing things out that people might one day come back and need, or want to use again. Even samples that we can hardly identify, waaaaay back in the -80C freezers, get kept around unless we know what they are and who was using them and that they wish to destroy the sample or declare it unsuitable for future research. Stuff gets shoved to the back, and you don’t look at it for years or sometimes decades. There are some truly bizarre things to be found when cleaning old freezers…but hopefully I never come across something like this.

There are probably more smallpox samples out there, in former Soviet states, and in the US. Hopefully they’re all as well-sealed and safe as this one was.

Via The Mary Sue/@pourmecoffee

deathandmysticism:

Honoré Fragonard, Écorché of a horse and its rider with mummification, 1766-71

deathandmysticism:

Honoré Fragonard, Écorché of a horse and its rider with mummification, 1766-71

Reblogged from The Ancient Serpent
Tags: anatomy mummy