mortem-et-necromantia:

The Tarim mummies are a series of mummies discovered in the Tarim Basin in present-day Xinjiang, China, which date from 1900 BCE to 200 CE. Some of the mummies are frequently associated with the presence of the Indo-European Tocharian languages.

Research into the subject has attracted controversy, due to ethnic tensions in modern day Xinjiang. There have been concerns whether DNA results could affect claims by Uyghur peoples of being indigenous to the region. In comparing the DNA of the mummies to that of modern day Uyghur peoples, Victor H. Mair’s team found some genetic similarities with the mummies, but no direct links, stating that “modern DNA and ancient DNA show that Uighurs, Kazaks, Krygyzs, the peoples of Central Asia are all mixed Caucasian and East Asian… the modern and ancient DNA tell the same story.” He concludes that the mummies are Caucasoid, likely speakers of an Indo-European language; that East Asian peoples “began showing up in the eastern portions of the Tarim Basin about 3,000 years ago… while the Uighur peoples arrived after the collapse of the Orkon Uighur Kingdom, largely based in modern day Mongolia, around the year 842.”

Tags: mummies

madamecuratrix:

A delicately hand-painted and highly detailed anatomical head for class. Made of wood and plaster. Left side showing muscles, right side skull. Right side detachable with removable brain parts. Germany. Ca. 1910.

Reblogged from A Curated Miscellaneum
Tags: art
historicaltimes:

French soldier, whose face was mutilated in WWI, being fitted with a mask made at the Red Cross studio of Anna Coleman Ladd. July 1918

historicaltimes:

French soldier, whose face was mutilated in WWI, being fitted with a mask made at the Red Cross studio of Anna Coleman Ladd. July 1918

Reblogged from The Glamour Corpse
Reblogged from Outsidesin
Tags: deformty
Reblogged from A Curated Miscellaneum
Tags: x-ray skeleton

haaryounezumi:

KOSTNICE V SEDLCI
Kutna Hora, Czech Republic
.V

haaryounezumi

Reblogged from
edwardian-time-machine:

Women’s Medical College of Pennsylvania anatomy lab, 1892.
Source

edwardian-time-machine:

Women’s Medical College of Pennsylvania anatomy lab, 1892.

Source

Reblogged from TETRAGRAMMATON
madamecuratrix:

Mensur fencing injuries.

madamecuratrix:

Mensur fencing injuries.

Reblogged from A Curated Miscellaneum
Tags: fencing injury
malformalady:

A Paracas skull: note the dimple toward the top of the head, which is a product of head-binding, depressing the suture between the parietal plate. Head binding is a form of body alteration in which the skull of a human being is intentionally deformed. It is done by distorting the normal growth of a child’s skull by applying force. It is typically carried out on an infant, as the skull is most pliable at this time. In a typical case, headbinding begins approximately a month after birth and continues for about six months.

malformalady:

A Paracas skull: note the dimple toward the top of the head, which is a product of head-binding, depressing the suture between the parietal plate. Head binding is a form of body alteration in which the skull of a human being is intentionally deformed. It is done by distorting the normal growth of a child’s skull by applying force. It is typically carried out on an infant, as the skull is most pliable at this time. In a typical case, headbinding begins approximately a month after birth and continues for about six months.

Reblogged from TETRAGRAMMATON
Tags: skull

mortem-et-necromantia:

Catacombe dei Cappuccini.